Benny Gettinger: Photo-Graphic Artist

Posts tagged “gun

Weekend Wing Shooting

Winghaven Lodge

Winghaven Lodge, Providence, KY; 11-photo panoramic

Brad and I took a trip down to Providence, KY to test out the CZ Upland Ultralight that he’s writing an article about. Testing the shotgun however was only 1 of many purposes of our trip, not excluding simply having fun with some guns, although I didn’t shoot much since I needed to focus on the photography (I sometimes tend to get carried away with the shooting and forget to take photos). Brad is also hoping to write another article about Winghaven Lodge, and we discovered some more opportunities

Browning Maxus

Browning Maxus 12ga

along the way. Brad invited Andrew and Katie from Must Have Outdoors to come and test some Browning and Winchester shotguns for their show (which will also give Winghaven some more much-deserved exposure). We both got to try out the new Browning Maxus 12ga semi-auto, and Brad was thinking about the possibility of writing a review about it, so I took plenty of photos of it too.

George with his Holland & Holland

George cleaning his gorgeous Holland & Holland

But the most intriguing part of the weekend was meeting a gentleman by the name of George Gans. George is a regular at Woodhaven, and is a friend of Russell, the owner. We met George when we arrived on Friday night, and it didn’t long before it was revealed that he brought not only a Purdey shotgun, but also a Holland & Holland – both of which are high-dollar, hand-crafted firearms made to order in London, England. George actually carried the Purdey when we went afield the next day. In some ways George actually reminded me of “the most interesting man in the world” from the Dos Equis (XX) commercials. Not that he walked around with a harem of women, but he had a seemingly endless repository of stories to keep us entertained all day.

Brad with the Purdey

Brad with the Purdey

George was fun to talk with while walking through the fields, and he was also very generous in sharing his toys. To my amazement (and Brad’s) he actually let brad shoot a bird with his Purdey! Brad was tickled to death, and I was glad to take pictures. Brad definitely looks better with a Purdey. Brad shot his bird like the pro that he is, and George was glad to share the joy.

After lunch, George was gracious enough to lend me his Holland & Holland for a photo shoot. Brad is also doing an article on Kentucky bird hunting, which will talk about other Kentucky traditions such as bourbon. Winghaven was the perfect place to stage this shot because of their vast selection of fine bourbons. Having the Holland & Holland really made this photo. Nothing says shooting tradition like a hand-crafted double barrel shotgun.

George is a neat guy. I hope our paths cross again some day.

Kentucky Traditions

Kentucky Traditions


Higher Expectations

CZ75’s 12ga “Upland Ultralight” Shotgun

A few weeks ago we visited our friends in Ohio. We happened to have some of our photo equipment with us, so Brad recommended that we take a few photos of this CZ shotgun for an article he is writing about it. I’m always interested in shotguns, so I was excited. When I picked up this particular gun, I was shocked at how incredibly light it was. The “Upland Ultralight” weighs only 6 lbs! It was a pretty good fit for me too. I wanted to take some photos of it, but I also wanted to shoot the thing!

Shooting the CZ Upland Ultralight

Brad testing the CZ Upland Ultralight

Being winter and rainy, there wasn’t a great place outdoors to take photos of it, and the backdrops we brought were only good for a little girl (who we were planing to photograph the next day). So we found a white sheet to put it in front of. I wanted to hurry the photo shoot because I wanted to have enough time to shoot some clays with it.

When I download the photos to the computer, I was very unhappy about the result. The Upland Ultralight is somewhat of a no-frills shotgun, so to have it in front of a plain background was a huge mistake. I could not in good conscience submit those photos for Brad’s article. So this past weekend, I drove back up and brought some good backdrops etc., and we did it right.

I think I learned my lesson about doing things half-way. I never want to let myself down like that again!


A Hunt in the Wilderness of Maine

 

Sunrise over First Roach Pond

“This is the perfect backdrop,” said my good ol’ buddy Brad as we descended towards the Bangor International Airport. We had been planning this trip to Maine since spring, and it was to be my very first hunting experience with my new Browning BPS shotgun. Actually, it would be a lot of firsts for me: first time hunting birds and rabbits, first time hunting on this HEMISPHERE even, first time to set foot in Maine, and first time to eat duck for dinner. The hilly landscape in Maine was covered in vibrant fall foliage, and we had a great view from the jet.

In the midwest you really don’t hear much about Maine. Other New England states get a lot more attention. I feel ignorant for saying this, but I didn’t even realize there was any “wilderness” at all on the East Coast. Every time I’ve been out east it has been to crowded places like New York City, Washington D.C., etc., but Maine is the most heavily forested US state. It’s 90% trees! So it’s understandable that it has some great hunting grounds too.

Brad was writing an article about hunting grouse and hare in Maine, and I came to take photos for it. But I think I did more hunting than shooting, if you know what I mean.

 

The forest floor covered in moss.

We arrived at the Northern Pride Lodge on Friday afternoon around 3 – just enough time for a short grouse hunt. Our guide Wayne found a suitable spot. I don’t think I was mentally prepared for just how dense the trees really were. When I looked at the edge of the forest I thought, “I can’t fit in there!” but I looked over and my companions were already inside, so I closed up and plunged in. It was really hard to weave through the poplars and deciduous tamarack trees with a big heavy gun and a big heavy camera. Besides the density of the plant life, the ground was also very rough. Big rocks, tree stumps, fallen trees, and even streams all laid under a thick, fluffy bed of moss. At one point I stepped through the moss into a stream. As I walked, my shoe came off and my next socked step was into ANOTHER stream. Wayne graciously offered to carry my camera which I gladly accepted.

Being without my camera I realized that now, instead of following the action and taking photos, I WAS the action. How do I take photos of that?¬†In sporting magazines I see a lot of photos with hunters and their dead animals, but not a lot of photos of the actual hunt. This is where I try to be different with Brad’s articles. I don’t think many journalists get to have a photographer follow them around while they hunt. But since I was hunting too, I couldn’t get a lot of those action shots.

On Saturday morning we were ready to hunt some snowshoe hares. Wayne roused the five beagles, and we headed back into the woods. The dogs chased bunnies around the woods all morning, and after hiking all throughout a 1.5-mile radius I hadn’t gotten a single glimpse of a rabbit. Finally, at about 2:00 in the afternoon I saw one hop over the brush. The next hop was met with a well-timed BANG! I eagerly approached my first-ever rabbit, but the dogs were more eager than I. Before we knew it, all five dogs were divvying up the quarry. Eventually we were able to harness all the dogs, and gather the parts of the rabbit. After 6 hours of hunting, and only one rabbit, the hunting party couldn’t help but laugh with resignation. Brad wasn’t laughing though. He was very concerned because we really needed a photo of a rabbit, otherwise he couldn’t sell the article! He was able to hold all the pieces together though, and I got a photo that worked with very little Photoshop clean-up. I saved a foot.

We ate a very late, very delicious lunch. The dogs were completely worn out after their long run, so a continuation of the rabbit hunt was out of the question. We spent the rest of the afternoon hunting more ruffed grouse.

By Saturday night, I had bagged two ruffed grouse and one snowshoe hare. The sun was setting over the picturesque mountains as we headed back to the lodge. Miraculously, my lens was without a scratch, which is more than I can say for my Browning BPS.


My First Gun

Browning BPS

My Browning BPS shotgun. There's an inlay of two pheasants on the left side, and three ducks on the right.

Today I am a proud new owner of a Browning BPS 12 gauge pump shotgun. I’ve been wanting to get a shotgun for a couple years now, but it had just in the back of my mind. It wasn’t an impulse buy, but this weekend seemed like the perfect time to get it. My wife was hosting a baby shower at our house, so we had some friends come in from out of town. The guys were planning to go shooting while the women-folk had the party. One of those guys was my good friend Brad Fitzpatrick. Brad is a genius when it comes to firearms. I figured he could help me make a smart buy before we went out to shoot clay pigeons in the afternoon.

So this morning Brad and I hopped in the car, picked up or friend Dan, and headed up to Evans Firearms in Lexington, KY. I knew that I wanted a pump action, and I wanted a nice wood stock. After we looked around a bit we noticed that Evans actually has a pretty great selection of used shotguns. First I asked to see one of the Remingtons, and the guy handed me an 870. I like how they eject the shell out of the side, but the only wood finish I like from Remington is on the Wingmasters. They didn’t have any used, and they’re probably a bit out of my price range anyway. Then I asked to see the Browning. I hadn’t noticed before, but when he pulled it from the rack I saw that it had a really neat inlay design on either side. On the left are two pheasants, and on the right are three ducks. Very pretty. After being reassured by Brad that it was indeed a great gun, I decided to buy it.

We took it home and disassembled it to clean it. Brad looked down the barrel and, I believe his words were, “This is literally the most disgusting barrel I have ever seen.” But we cleaned out the dust and grime, and it sparkled like new. Brad guessed that its first owner had never fired it.

When we went out in the afternoon to shoot I really fell in love with it. It’s a lot more fun to shoot with your own gun instead of borrowing one. And I’ve never shot better! This will be a fun new hobby.